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Meg and Bert Raynes Wildife Fund

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Meg and Bert Raynes

Pondering the proposition that if people knew more about the lives and needs of the wildlife about them, they could---IF THEY WOULD be more generous toward and caring about their wild companions. Meg and Bert Raynes conclude they just might. It's the hope of all education. Meg and Bert have always shared what facts they learned by watching and reading (mostly birds to be sure) as they could. The Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund hopes to continue and expand that purpose, and that hope into the future.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund is to initiate, augment, or simply fund projects or activities to help maintain viable and sustainable wildlife populations into the future, especially in Wyoming and Jackson Hole, through support of research, education, habitat protection and habitat restoration.

Grant Request Forms: 2017

MBRWF Grant Application Form

MBRWF Grant Policy

Meg and Bert Raynes

Meg grew up in a small town, knowing farm life and open spaces. I grew up in a highly urbanized setting, innocent of mother nature. A perfect match.

Meg introduced me to the outdoors. She learned to cope with urban living. From the first place we lived and worked, we could get to Adirondack State Park in upstate New York and we went camping with colleagues at work. It was the first time we were with people who would identify birds by their voices before they got out of their sleeping bags. Noted, but not further pursued. We became wet fly fishermen; Meg tied flies. We got a little piece of land on a large creek and built a fishing cabin. No power. Dug a well, dug a two holer.

Then came the osprey. I was oblivious to it, intent on deer watching. The osprey was indifferent to me, concentrating on a big fish below it, and simply did its thing. Great splash of water, reaching me in fact, bird struggling to rise with this big bass. A fish one envied (for its size, that is).

Curiosity finally aroused. To the Public Library, a conditioned response. Found a Roger Tory Peterson’s bird field guide. Found osprey. Then, great blue herons. And, a bittern. All big birds.

Then, asking about those birdsongs, those little birds folks exclaimed over, and—downhill from there. We became birdwatchers. Meg was far better at it, but not possessed. I got into it. Each to her own. A college professor had already made me into a preservationist, a conservationist. Meg and I have been called lots of names since those days, but having thought deeply about environmental issues and the future of humanity, call us environmentalists or tree-huggers as you will. We sure are.

We were active in environmental causes, particularly water pollution ones. Ultimately I worked in that cause. We performed boots-on-the-ground restoration of habitats until we no longer could, still adding our voices in similar causes. At that time, Meg and I began to consider what we might be able to do, if anything, past our time.

I can't say these discussions were organized, particularly early on. We have no children, one consideration. We have no large tract of land. The more we talked, the more the ideas of helping worthwhile small projects to help Jackson Hole wildlife. We had observed that often some useful restoration work or project initiation would be delayed or lost for the want of public knowledge or of a small financial assist. We looked for some way we could pass that down.

This was all just conversation between us until Meg died. Turning to our many wonderful friends for advice and counsel, the idea of establishing a sustainable fund to help or initiate projects concerned primarily with the wildlife of Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Should have done that sooner. Things progressed, as they can when folks participate freely and intelligently, and so the Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund was created. I believe Meg would be pleased and satisfied.

That's all history. What matters now is what the Fund shall achieve.

Bert Raynes


Bert Raynes Video (Click if video doesn't play)

Bert Raynes Bibliography

Books

Birds of Sage and Scree (2010)
This book is an artistic collaboration between two individuals—Bert Raynes and Greg McHuron. Working with a bird list supplied by Bert, Greg painted not only the bird in its habitat but also included silhouettes of other inhabitants. The book contains 25 original paintings by Greg and informational and insightful text by Bert.
Note: All proceeds from this book benefit the Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund. It is available from Grandview Publishing at http://www.birdsofsageandscree.info/
Jackson, WY: Grandview Publishing. ISBN-13: 9781880114360 (Standard Edition) ISBN-13: 9781880114353 (Limited Edition)

A View from the Museum: A Wildlife Viewing Guide (2007)
Depicting wildlife during the various seasons, this guide uses artwork along with Bert’s text to discover what animals are seen and their activities throughout the year. This book also encourages the reader to step outside and view the wildlife.
Jackson Hole, WY: National Museum of Wildlife Art and Bert Raynes. ISBN: none

Winter Wings: Birds of the Northern Rockies (2003)
Organized in sections describing food dependency, this book explains how birds survive during the winter in the Northern Rockies. The information is beautifully illustrated by the acclaimed photography of Thomas D. Mangelsen.
Omaha: Images of Nature. ISBN: 1890310352

Curmudgeon Chronicles (1998)
Taken from Bert‘s weekly natural history column, Far Afield, printed in the Jackson Hole News and Guide plus some essays, this book is a collection of Bert’s observations on man’s foibles including a variety of topics such as: aging, politics, campaigning, research and buying this book.
Jackson, WY: White Willow Publishing. ISBN: 0964242346

Valley So Sweet (1995)
In a journal spanning several decades, Bert penned observations of the natural world and man’s place in it. This book is the distillate of that work covering seasonal observations in a voice that is alternately gentle, wise, sardonic and wickedly funny.
Jackson, WY: White Willow Publishing. ISBN: 0964242311

Finding the Birds of Jackson Hole (1994)
Written by Bert Raynes and Darwin Wile, the authors provide insightful information on birding in Jackson Hole from bird etiquette to bird lists. This book focuses on driving and biking loops as well as day hikes that cover diverse terrains and difficulty levels. Sections are included on birds to look for, best bets as to where to find the species and identifying confusing birds.
Jackson, WY: Darwin Wile. ISBN-13: 9780879499938 ISBN-10: 0879499931

Birds of Grand Teton National Park and the Surrounding Area (1984)
This guidebook features sixty carefully chosen species including both common and unusual birds for this area. Straightforward and direct, the text focuses specifically on habitats and species within the park and surrounding area. Color pictures are included with each species description. Advice about the best places to find the birds along with general comments are shared with a light touch.
Moose, WY: Grand Teton Natural History Association. ISBN: 0931895006

Weekly Newspaper Column

Far Afield - Bert's weekly column published in the Jackson Hole News and Guide

Educational Resources

The links on this page are intended as an educational resource for citizens to learn more about the natural world and wildlife. This is by no means a complete collection but rather a gathering of interesting materials. These materials focus on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and the species that call this area home.

Under each topic heading there are links to articles, informational websites and book titles. The value of guidebooks as a resource for information about our natural world should not be overlooked. Here in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem we are grateful to the many authors and scientists who have taken the time to share basic ecological information, past and current research and wisdom with others.

Meg and Bert's philosophy of learning about the natural world is grounded in reading, learning from others and observing. This collection of resources is made in their tradition.

Birds

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Global Warming and Songbirds - Wyoming Report American Bird Conservancy and National Wildlife Federation 2002 article by Jeff Price.

Techniques Attract Desired Bird Species to Barnyards and Backyards Barnyards and Backyards article, summer 2006 issue

Who's Who of Famous Western Birds Barnyards and Backyards article, Fall 2008 issue

Create Homes So Bluebirds Come Your Way Barnyards and Backyards article, Winter 2008 issue

How Does A Sea Duck Find Its Way to Wyoming? Harlequin Wyoming Wildlife Article, August 2006 issue

Bert's Bibliography When looking to learn more about the birds of Jackson Hole, be sure to reference Bert's Bibliography for the incredibly informative resources he has provided over the years.

Christmas Bird Count Data, Jackson, WY The Christmas Bird Count is a nation-wide citizen science effort to organized by the Audubon Society to collect data on wintering birds. This project has been going on for over 100 years! The Jackson area count is organized through the Jackson Bird Club. Click to see the 2014 Count Results or Historical Data for the Jackson Hole Count Circle.

Bears

Precautions Can Ease Human-Bear Conflicts Barnyards and Backyards article, Spring 2007 issue

Bears Will Be Bears The Wildlife Professional article, Winter 2009 issue

Tracking for a Living Essay by Kerry Murphy, PhD on a scent tracking

Bison

The Second Recovery of Bison: Ecological Restoration of North America's Largest Land Mammal The Wildlife Professional article, Fall 2009 issue

Moose

Why Are Moose Populations Declining? Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance News, Summer 2011 issue

Pika

Keeping Their Cool Wyoming Wildlife, July 2010 issue

Pronghorn

Bridger-Teton Protects Pronghorn Jackson Hole News and Guide article, June 3, 2008.

End of the Road? Smithsonian Magazine article, January, 2007

The Last Mile: How to Sustain Long-Distance Migration in Mammals A peer-reviewed research article by Joel Berger published in Conservation Biology, Vol. 18(2), April 2004.

Connecting the Dots: An Invariant Migration Corridor Links the Holocene to the Present A peer-reviewed research article by Joel Berger, Steven Cain and Kim Murray Berger published in Biological Letters, Vol 2, June 2006.

Indirect Effects and Traditional Trophic Cascades: A Test Involving Wolves, Coyotes and Pronghorn A peer-reviewed research article by Kim Murray Berger, et al. published in Ecology, Vol. 89(3), 2008

Citizen Science

Citizen Science Wyoming Wildlife, March 2010 issue

Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

The Greater Yellowstone Science Learning Center maintains an expansive resource of information on natural resources of all kinds found within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Some time spent looking through their website will be rewarded with educational resources ranging from Facts Sheets on particular wildlife species to updates on current research happening within the GYE.

The Greater Yellowstone Science Learning Center describes their website as "a portal to information about the natural and cultural resources of Yellowstone and Grand Teton (including John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway) national parks and Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area. By reporting on what has been learned from research and monitoring in these parks, we hope to increase public awareness of new findings and encourage studies that will help guide park management decisions. The National Park Service has set up Research Learning Centers as public-private partnerships that promote the sharing of scientific knowledge about the parks".

Please take some time to investigate what is there by clicking here.

Habitat

To Build A Pond in Wyoming Barnyards and Backyards article, Spring 2008 issue

Improving Land With Grass and Forb Seed Barnyards and Backyards article, Summer 2005 issue

Controlling Noxious Weeds Barnyards and Backyards article, Summer 2006 issue

Planting for Backyard Wildlife Barnyards and Backyards article, Autumn 2005 issue

Think Native When Restoring Small-Acreage Rangelands Barnyards and Backyards article, Spring 2007 issue

"Who Ate The Backyard?" Living With Wildlife on Private Lands An insightful guide to living with wildlife by Charlie Craighead. Published by Grand Teton Natural History Association and the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation in cooperation with the National Park Service in 1997.

Roadkill

Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation For more information on Roadkill issues in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, please visit the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation's website. Here you will find a wealth of resources on the roadkill topic as well as the 2003 Roadkill Report compiled by Biota Research.

Funded Projects

Fully or Partially Funded Research Projects for 2017

Title: 2017-2018 Jackson Hole Adopt-a-Trout Program
Project Leader: Leslie Steen, Trout Unlimited
Project Summary: The Jackson Hole Adopt-a-Trout (AaT) Program works with the Teton County School District to educate students about their local watershed and fisheries while also providing important data to resource managers. The program is both a robust educational program and a research project with real-world applications – which together help improve the health of our community’s aquatic resources by cultivating the next generation of stewards and identifying on-the-ground conservation needs. The 2017-2018 program will be organized around a radiotelemetry study of native Snake River cutthroat trout movement in the Upper Snake watershed that informs active and future reconnection and restoration projects.


Title: American Kestrel Survival
Project Leader: Ross Crandall, Craighead Beringia South
Project Summary: American kestrels are declining in western Wyoming and we do not know why. As a result, we are proposing a project to estimate adult survival and seasonal patterns of mortality to gauge the contribution of mortality on the documented downward population trend. We will use tracking devices to assess survival of kestrels during the nesting and non-nesting seasons by tracking the birds while they are here and seeing if they return. Kestrel survival and timing of mortality is an extremely important aspect to understanding and slowing the decline of kestrels in Jackson Hole.


Title: Nesting Demographics of Flammulated Owls in Jackson Hole
Project Leader: Bryan Bedrosian, Teton Raptor Center
Project Summary: Flammulated Owls are a small, nocturnal, migratory owl that is designated a USFS sensitive species in the Intermountain Region. Until just last year, this species’ breeding and population status in western Wyoming has remained completely unknown. In 2016, we conducted a limited set of surveys in Teton County and detected an estimated 16 territories. Capitalizing on this initial dataset, we are proposing to initiate the first-ever study of Flammulated Owls in western Wyoming. Through a combination of night-surveys, nest-searching, nest-monitoring and prey assessments, we will collect the first demographic and prey abundance data for Flammulated Owls in Jackson Hole.


Title: Genetic Connectivity of a Rocky Mountain Hummingbird in Threatened Sky-island Habitats
Project Leader: Braden Lewis Godwin
Project Summary: Sky islands are systems of mountains and valleys with limited dispersal among high-elevation habitats, forming biological “islands.” High-elevation bird species are sensitive to climate change because phenology of plants shift and habitats shrink. Broad-tailed Hummingbirds (Selasphorus platycercus) breed in montane habitats in the Rocky Mountains. Banding studies show S. platycercus exhibits high fidelity to breeding sites. The health of Wyoming populations depends on the health of surrounding populations as well. I will estimate genetic connectivity of sky-island S. platycercus populations from Jackson, WY to southern Colorado to assess potential to maintain genetic diversity and population health in changing habitats.


Title: Great Grey Owls at the Range-Edge
Project Leader: Beth Mendelsohn
Project Summary: The Great Gray Owls (Strix nebulosa) of northwest Wyoming reside on a peninsular range-edge for the species. This causes unique genetic-level population dynamics mediated by range shape. Directional gene flow and selective pressures create implications for genetic diversity and evolutionary potential. My research integrates population genomics methods to existing field data to investigate population structure and connectivity across the owls’ range in the west.


Title: Spatial Ecology and Conservation of Long-distance Mule Deer Migrations from Grand Teton National Park
Project Leader: Steve Cain and Sarah Dewey
Project Summary: We propose to analyze the migratory movements of mule deer between summering grounds in GTNP and wintering grounds throughout the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. To date, our study has described five new long-distance migration corridors leading outward in all cardinal directions from the park. In addition to continued migration monitoring, detailed spatial and temporal analyses are now needed to assess potential risks to the permeability of each corridor, focusing on important terrain features and current and future land ownership, use, and development. These steps are necessary precursors to Title: development of long-term conservation actions designed to protect these important wildlife migration corridors.


Fully or Partially Funded Research Projects for 2016

Title: 8-Legged Architects: The Ecology Of Mound Building In Spiders
Project Leader: Maggie J. Raboin
Project Summary: Mason spiders (Castianeira teewinoticus) are a newly discovered and recently described species of spider in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. They are unique among spiders because they do not construct webs or burrows; they build mounds. Despite the conspicuous nature of their mound building behavior, the function of these mounds is unknown. The goals of the proposed project are twofold. First, the project will experimentally determine the adaptive function of mason spider mounds. Second, the project will determine the energetic costs and reproductive benefits of mound building.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: For everything there is a season – but the seasons, they are a changing: Phenology shifts in the Tetons
Project Leader: Corinna Riginos, Ph.D., Research Associate, Northern Rockies Conservation Cooperative
Project Summary: Many plants and animals are experiencing changes in the timing of their key life events (phenology) as the climate is warming. This may be causing once-common species to become rare. In the Tetons, Frank Craighead, Jr. observed plant phenology in the 1970’s, before significant climatic changes had occurred. We have compiled these observations into usable data; we now need to conduct field surveys to develop a detailed plan for collecting contemporary data and citizen scientist engagement. Ultimately we aim to understand the impacts of climate change on the Teton region while engaging the public and preserving the Craighead legacy.
Project Reports: To view summary report click here. To view final report click here.


Title: Phase 2: Connecting Wyoming’s Breeding Harlequin Duck Population to their Important Wintering and Molting Areas and Identifying Crucial Habitats
Project Leader: Lucas Savoy
Project Summary: Conserving Wyoming’s Harlequin Duck population will require a better understanding of the species’ breeding habitat requirements, general breeding ecology, and migration patterns. The Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund previously funded the acquisition of tracking devices needed to reach these objectives. We are proposing Phase 2 of the study: to initiate the tracking study and map currently unknown migration routes and identify important molting and wintering areas of Wyoming’s Harlequin Ducks. This project is part of a collaborative regional conservation study, to identify migration routes and wintering grounds for inland breeding populations of western North American Harlequin Duck.
Project Reports: To view executive summary click here. To view current status report click here.


Title: Stewardship in Action: Trumpeter Swan nest site monitoring and habitat improvement in Teton County, Wyoming.
Project Leader: Drew Reed
Project Summary: This project will monitor at least 4 active nesting territories in Teton County to investigate causes of frequent nesting failures and cygnet losses. We will provide land managers with possible management recommendations to improve nesting success. In collaboration with Susan Patla (WGFD), nest site improvement options will be investigated and implemented at the Upper Slide Lake territory. Also in collaboration with Susan, we will create a brochure targeted mainly at private landowners explaining the need and considerations for development of new swan nesting territories through wetland creation or enhancement.
Project Reports: To view executive summary click here. To view monitoring report click here.


Title: Demographic Study of Long-billed Curlews in Grand Teton National Park and the National Elk Refuge
Project Leader: Jay Carlisle
Project Summary: To follow up on successful tracking of Long-billed Curlews via satellite telemetry, we propose to collaborate to collect nesting data for curlews in the Jackson population. Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) and the National Elk Refuge (NER) together host the only known nesting curlews in Jackson Hole. Though we now have a sense for important wintering areas, we need data on how well this population is reproducing - another important element of full annual cycle conservation. This proposal would provide a field technician to monitor curlews during the nesting season in partnership with 2016 monitoring efforts by NER and GTNP.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Fully or Partially Funded Research Projects for 2015

Title: 2016 Jackson Hole Wildlife Symposium
Project Leader: Maggie Schilling, Northern Rockies Conservation Cooperative (NRCC)
Project Summary: The Jackson Hole Wildlife Symposium (JHWS) serves as the only local forum for wildlife scientists, agency personnel, and the public to share information on research and conservation efforts in the region. NRCC and the Teton Research Institute of Teton Science Schools co-sponsored the JHWS most recently in December of 2014. A sell-out crowd provided overwhelmingly positive feedback and asked that the event be held again soon. The MBRWF joined as an Event Sponsor for the next symposium, scheduled for late February or early March 2016.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: A Landowner’s Guide to Fences and Wildlife – 2nd Edition
Project Leader: Nicholas Rogers, Wyoming Wildlife – The Foundation
Project Summary: Wyoming Wildlife – The Foundation (WW-TF) is working to publish the second edition of A Landowner’s Guide to Fences and Wildlife, Practical Tips to Make Your Fences Wildlife Friendly. The book outlines several methods and techniques for how to make fences wildlife friendly and includes testimonials from landowners who have modified their fences to wildlife friendly. The second edition of the guidebook will have some new methods and techniques as well as current landowner success stories from Wyoming. The primary goal of this edition is to have it distributed to as many livestock producers and landowners as possible.
Project Report: The electronic version is available at http://wyomingwildlifefoundation.org/.


Title: Clark’s Nutcracker, an Avian Seed Dispenser
Project Leader: Taza Schaming, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Project Summary: Since 2009, I have been evaluating the impact of the decline of whitebark pine on Clark’s nutcracker demography and habitat selection. In 2014, I fit satellite transmitters to eight nutcrackers to document their long distance movements, for the first time studying habitat selection and movement at the ecologically relevant geographic spatial scale over which this conservation-critical Clark’s nutcracker-whitebark pine mutualism takes place. I will continue to track each individual for an estimated minimum of two years. My ultimate goal is to determine which management actions will increase the persistence of nutcrackers, and their important seed dispersal function, in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Evaluation of Trumpeter Swan nesting habitat and habitat improvement potential on the Wyoming portion of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest
Project Leader: Drew Reed, The Trumpeter Swan Society
Project Summary: This project will evaluate Trumpeter Swan nesting habitat quality, identify factors reducing nesting success, and recommend potential improvement measures on at least 6 lakes within the Wyoming portion of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest (CTNF). This area lies between Yellowstone National Park and key swan nesting areas in Jackson Hole and Idaho. Work will be accomplished in collaboration with The Trumpeter Swan Society (Project Leader: Ruth Shea, TTSS Greater Yellowstone Coordinator, 208-785-0314) United States Forest Service (USFS) and Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD).
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Quantifying wildlife resilience to climate change in Wyoming’s montane habitats.
Project Leader: Embere Hall, University of Wyoming: Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
Project Summary: The MBRWF grant supports the final year of a collaborative research initiative that addresses how well temperature-sensitive wildlife can buffer warming temperatures through changes in behavior. The American pika (Ochotona princeps) is used as a model organism. Results of this work will inform ongoing agency efforts to conserve Wyoming’s wildlife and to prioritize conservation actions in the face of climate change.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Long-billed Curlew Satellite Telemetry Project, Year Two: Grand Teton National Park
Project Leader: Jay Carlisle, Boise State University, Intermountain Bird Observatory
Project Summary: A satellite transmitter will be attached to a breeding adult Long-billed Curlew in Grand Teton National Park as part of a larger regional study to determine migration routes and wintering grounds. This project would increase the sample size for curlews breeding in the Jackson area and build on data collected last year on specific locations and habitats required during the non-breeding season. Location data will be available to the public on the Boise State University, Intermountain Bird Observatory website and via WGFD. In addition, results will be used for development of a regional conservation strategy.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: For Everything There is a Season – but the seasons, they are a changing: Phenology shifts in the Tetons
Project Leader: Corinna Riginos, Teton Research Institute of Teton Science Schools
Project Summary: Many plants and animals are experiencing changes in the timing of their key life events (phenology) as the climate is warming. These changes may be causing once-common species to become rare. In the Tetons, Frank Craighead, Jr. made detailed observations of plant and animal phenology in the 1980’s. This provides a rare opportunity to develop “baseline” data on phenology before significant climatic changes had occurred. By formalizing these notes into digital, quantitative data, the groundwork will be laid for studying phenology changes in the uniquely ecologically intact Teton-Yellowstone area while preserving the legacy of one of the region’s great naturalists.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Monitoring wildlife movement on South Highway 89
Project Leader: Cory Hatch, Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation
Project Summary: The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) is planning a large-scale reconstruction of South Highway 89/191 (SHWY89/191). As part of this reconstruction, WYDOT has proposed six large underpasses and many smaller structures to facilitate wildlife movement and reduce wildlife vehicle collisions. Four conservation groups are collaborating to begin pre-construction monitoring of wildlife at these sites using camera traps at identified crossing locations. Monitoring sites include crossing locations for ungulates and small mammals. Data and images obtained from this project will inform final design considerations and provide public education on the efficacy of underpasses in reducing wildlife collisions and promoting habitat connectivity.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Determining The Level of Detectability Using Environmental DNA (eDNA) Sampling and Traditional Methods to Inventory Amphibians: Improving Amphibian Conservation Efforts on The Bridger-Teton National Forest
Project Leader: Don DeLong, US Forest Service, Bridger – Teton National Forest
Project Summary: Current amphibian occupancy techniques on the Bridger-Teton National Forest (BTNF) involves visual and call detection surveys as a means to inventory sensitive amphibians, whose low abundancy and low detection rates have made detecting the presence-absence of amphibians difficult, time consuming, and costly. This grant will assist the implementation of environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling as a new, cost effective technique to inventory amphibians. Water samples collected by BTNF wildlife crews at key inventory locations will be analyzed to positively identify amphibian species. By comparing results from eDNA sampling with results from traditional surveys completed by wildlife crews, eDNA sampling would test the effectiveness of wildlife crews to detect species within wetland sites.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Spring Banding and Summer Surveys of the Black Rosy-Finch in Wyoming
Project Leader: Vincent Spagnuolo, Biodiversity Research Institute
Project Summary: This study will initiate survey work on the Black Rosy-Finch (BLRF) which is one of the least studied birds in the Rocky Mountain West. As a high elevation-obligate nester, range contraction and habitat changes resulting from climate warming could lead to local extirpation of the species. Knowledge gained in 2015 will provide needed baseline data for a graduate study scheduled to begin in 2016 by the University of Wyoming Coop Unit, funded through a WGFD State Wildlife Grant. The graduate study will focus on assessing the abundance and habitat of nesting BLRF in northwestern WY, developing habitat models to determine risk of predicted climate changes, and a long-term monitoring protocol to determine population trends over time. Data collected this summer will provide information on potential nesting areas and determine through spring banding work the possibility of tracking migration and winter movements in future years. Given the extremely short nesting season for this species, this preliminary work will help ensure the success of the future graduate research study. Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI), which is already conducting avian studies in the region on Harlequin Ducks and Common Loons, would be continuing a partnership with Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) and the MBRWF to study non-game species to make sure that viable populations are maintained into the future.


Fully or Partially Funded Research Projects for 2014

Title: Assessing Snail and Trematode Biodiversity in Jackson, WY at swan concentration areas
Project Leader: Amy Krist, University of Wyoming
Project Summary: Little is known about the species richness of snails and their associated trematode parasites in Teton County. However, recent necropsies on Trumpeter Swans revealed that many swans that died carry very high loads of trematode parasites. This study would be the first to investigate snail and associated parasite diversity in wetlands where swans congregate in winter/early spring.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Craighead and Craighead Raptor Census (1947-2014)
Project Leader: Bryan Bedrosian, Craighead Beringia South
Project Summary: Raptor populations have been periodically surveyed in Jackson Hole for over 65 years, starting with Frank and John Craighead’s seminal study surrounding Blacktail Butte, beginning in 1947. Data from past follow-up surveys have shown several key changes in the raptor community in Jackson Hole. Specifically, the numbers of species and individual pairs of several raptors and owls have been declining over the years, while corvid numbers have exhibited increases. This project offers a unique opportunity to continue monitoring the health of Jackson Hole’s raptor population. By replicating the original Craighead survey and building upon their work, this project can contribute to one of the longest running scientific datasets on raptors in North America.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Multiscale landscape patterns of habitat selection and resource tracking by the Clark’s nutcracker, an avian seed disperser
Project Leader: Cynthia Todd/Taza Schaming, Cornell University
Project Summary: Since 2009, Taza Schaming has been evaluating the impact of the decline of whitebark pine on Clark’s nutcracker demography and habitat selection. In 2014, she will fit satellite transmitters to nutcrackers to document their long distance movements, for the first time studying habitat selection and movement at the ecologically relevant geographic spatial scale over which this conservation-critical mutualism takes place. For more information on Taza's study, please click here
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Monitoring Amphibian Breeding Efforts on the National Elk Refuge
Project Leader: Debra Patla, Research Associate; Northern Rockies Conservation Cooperative (NRCC)
Project Summary: Amphibians of the National Elk Refuge have been the subject of inventory and monitoring since 1998. This grant supports a final year of monitoring and reporting, with a focus on breeding effort at key sites. The results could encourage managers and the public to see amphibians as a valuable component of biodiversity and to protect their habitat.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Long-billed Curlew Satellite Telemetry Project, National Elk Refuge
Project Leader: Jay Carlisle, Research Director; Idaho Bird Observatory, Boise State University
Project Summary: This project will involve attaching satellite transmitters to two adult Long-billed Curlews on the National Elk Refuge to determine migration routes and wintering grounds. This would provide the first information on specific locations and habitats required during the non-breeding season by curlews that nest in Wyoming.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Pilot study to evaluate a long-term Harlequin Duck breeding population monitoring study in Wyoming’s Grand Teton National Park
Project Leader: Pilot study to evaluate a long-term Harlequin Duck breeding population monitoring study in Wyoming’s Grand Teton National Park
Project Summary: In order to make informed decisions on the conservation of Wyoming’s Harlequin Duck population, a better understanding of the species’ breeding habitat requirements, general breeding ecology and migration information is needed. This will be the initiation of a breeding Harlequin Duck population monitoring project in Grand Teton National Park, through uniquely marking individuals with color leg bands.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Documenting distribution and habitat attributes for northern flying squirrel in Teton County, Wyoming
Project Leader: Martin Grenier, Nongame Biologist, Wyoming Game and Fish Department
Project Summary: Northern flying squirrels serve as excellent indicators of forest function and health. In Teton County, surveys have not been done and little is known about distribution or habitat use. Surveys will allow us to develop a baseline occupancy model, and evaluate vegetative composition and structure important for this species. Data from Jackson will complement data being collected elsewhere in Wyoming.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Fully or Partially Funded Research Projects for 2013

Title: Distribution, prevalence, and feeding patterns for tabanid flies (i.e. horse flies), the vector of the arterial worm of sheep and cervids (i.e. moose)
Project Leader: Amy Williams
Project Summary: Tabanid flies are thought to be responsible for transmission of the carotid artery worm to moose. Historically moose were not infected with carotid artery worm. Currently, approximately 50% of the moose in Wyoming are infected. This research will give us a better understanding of the mechanics and to what level horseflies transmit this parasite to moose.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: Creating Educational Opportunities for Citizen Scientists in Jackson Hole--co-funded with Nature Mapping of Jackson Hole and the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole.
Project Leader: Teton Raptor Center
Project Summary: Teton Raptor Center and Nature Mapping Jackson Hole are introducing a series of raptor identification courses during spring 2014. These courses will engage citizen scientists of Jackson Hole and increase knowledge and awareness of raptors. Three courses will take place in the months of March, April, and May, followed by a Nature Mapping certification course
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Fully or Partially Funded Research Projects for 2012

Title: Snake River Regional Wetland Plan—co-funded with local partners including Ducks Unlimited Jackson and the Teton Conservation District
Project Leader: Susan Patla and Brian Remlinger
Project Summary: This new regional plan is part of the state-wide wetland conservation planning effort by the Wyoming Bird Habitat Conservation Partnership to focus conservation actions and dollars to top priority wetland complexes. The draft has been finished and submitted for final editing and approval by the state.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Title: The Impact of Whitebark Pine Mortality on Clark’s Nutcracker Demography and Habitat Use
Project Leader: Taza Schaming
Project Summary: This important study will help give a better understanding of how the pine’s decline is affecting nutcracker populations and behavior.
Project Report: To view project report click here.


Fully or Partially Funded Research Projects for 2011

Title: The Impact of Whitebark Pine Mortality on Clark’s Nutcracker Demography and Habitat Use
Project Leader: Taza Schaming
Project Summary: This important study will enlighten us about the variables that affect one particular species.
Project Report: To view project report click here.

Sponsored Projects

Nature Mapping Jackson Hole Originating with the Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund, the Nature Mapping Jackson Hole (NMJH) citizen science project is housed under the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation (JHWF). Bert Raynes is very involved sitting on the NMJH Advisory Committee and participating in the project. The Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund remains a partial supporter of the NMJH project and the partnership between MBRWF and JHWF is firmly grounded in the desire to help Jackson Hole's wildlife community.

How You Can Help

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Meg and Bert Raynes



The Meg and Bert Raynes Fund is a directed fund through the Jackson Hole Community Foundation. Its purpose is to support research and educational opportunities aimed at maintaining viable and sustainable wildlife populations and the Jackson Hole environment. The Meg and Bert Raynes Fund appreciates contributions through tax-deductible donations.

To contribute to the Meg and Bert Raynes Fund, please send donations to:

Meg and Bert Raynes Fund
Jackson Hole Community Foudation
PO Box 574
Jackson, WY 83001

Contact Us

For more information on Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund please send emails to:

megandbertrayneswildlifefund@gmail.com

Privacy Statement

This statement sets forth the Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund Privacy Statement for rayneswildlifefund.org and describes the practices that Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund will follow with respect to the privacy of users of this site. From time to time, we may change this Privacy Statement. As we update and improve our service, new features may require modifications to the Privacy Statement. Please check back periodically.

What is personally identifiable information?
Personally identifiable information is information about you, such as name, address, e-mail address, credit card number, and so on.

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We may request that you voluntarily supply us with information, including your e-mail address, street address, telephone number or other information so that we may enhance your site visit or follow up with you after your visit. Whether you provide any information is entirely up to you.

If you have voluntarily provided information, you consented to the collection and use of your personally identifiable information as described in this Privacy Statement. We do not sell or rent personal information collected through this site to anyone. Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund may disclose information in special cases when we have a good faith belief that such action is necessary to: (a) conform to legal requirements or comply with legal process; (b) protect and defend our rights or property; (c) enforce the Web site Terms and Conditions of Use; or (d) act to protect the interests of our users or others.

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If you have voluntarily provided information, you consented to the collection and use of your personally identifiable information as described in this Privacy Statement.

If you have voluntarily provided personally identifiable information, we may, from time to time, send you mail or e-mail regarding special events, website updates or other relevant information. If you do not want to receive such mailings, you can easily indicate that by sending an email to us.

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How do we protect your information?
We exercise great care to protect your personally identifiable information. This includes, among other things, using industry standard techniques such as firewalls, encryption, intrusion detection and site monitoring. Unfortunately, no data transmission over the Internet can be guaranteed to be 100% secure. As a result, while we strive to protect your personally identifiable information, we cannot ensure or warrant the security of any information you transmit to us or receive from us. This is especially true for information you transmit to us via e-mail. We have no way of protecting that information until it reaches us. Once we receive your transmission, we make our best effort to ensure its security on our servers.

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Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund site(s) may contain links to other sites. While we seek to link only to sites that share our high standards and respect for privacy, we are not responsible for the privacy practices employed by other sites.

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Under no circumstances shall Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund be liable for any damages suffered by you, including any incidental, special or consequential damages (including, without limitation, any lost profits or damages for business interruption, loss of information, programs or other data) that result from access to, use of, or inability to use this site or due to any breach of security associated with the transmission of information through the internet, even if Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund was advised of the possibility of such damages.

Privacy
Protecting the privacy of our clients and users of our Site is important to Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund. The Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund Privacy Statement describes how we use and protect information you provide to us.

Terms

Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund, along with its subsidiaries and affiliates, provides the information and services on its World Wide Web site(s) (the "Site") under the following terms and conditions. By accessing and/or using the Site, you indicate your acceptance of these terms and conditions.

LAWS AND REGULATIONS. Access to and use of this Site are subject to all applicable international, federal, state and local laws and regulations. User agrees not to use the Site in any way that violates such laws or regulations.

COPYRIGHT AND TRADEMARKS. The information available on or through this Site is the property of Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund, or its licensors, and is protected by copyright, trademark, and other intellectual property laws. Users may not modify, copy, distribute, transmit, display, publish, sell, license, create derivative works or otherwise use any information available on or through this Site for commercial or public purposes.

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LINKS TO THIRD PARTY SITES. This Site may contain links that will let you access other Web sites that are not under the control of Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund. The links are only provided as a convenience and Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund does not endorse any of these sites. Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund assumes no responsibility or liability for any material that may be accessed on other Web sites reached through this Site, nor does Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund make any representation regarding the quality of any product or service contained at any such site.

NO WARRANTIES. Information and documents provided on this Site are provided "as is" without warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement. Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund uses reasonable efforts to include accurate and up-to-date information on this Site; it does not, however, make any warranties or representations as to its accuracy or completeness. Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund periodically adds, changes, improves, or updates the information and documents on this Site without notice. Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund assumes no liability or responsibility for any errors or omissions in the content of this Site. Your use of this Site is at your own risk.

LIMITATION OF LIABILITY. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHALL MEG AND BERT RAYNES WILDLIFE FUND BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES SUFFERED BY YOU, INCLUDING ANY INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY LOST PROFITS OR DAMAGES FOR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, LOSS OF INFORMATION, PROGRAMS OR OTHER DATA) THAT RESULT FROM ACCESS TO, USE OF, OR INABILITY TO USE THIS SITE OR DUE TO ANY BREACH OF SECURITY ASSOCIATED WITH THE TRANSMISSION OF INFORMATION THROUGH THE INTERNET, EVEN IF MEG AND BERT RAYNES WILDLIFE FUND WAS ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

PRIVACY. Protecting the privacy of our clients and users of our Sites is important to Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund. Meg and Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund Privacy Statement describes how we use and protect information you provide to us.

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